If you can't find an answer to your question below, then please feel free to contact us directly or come in for an initial appointment - we'll be more than happy to answer your questions.

 

How do I get an appointment at the clinic?

Please contact the reception at clinics@auckland.ac.nz, or by phone on 09 923 9909. Be sure to mention that you want to be booked into the Myopia Clinic, so the reception staff can book you with the appropriate clinician.

 

Is there any additional charge for the Myopia Control Clinic?

No, standard optometric charges apply, and as we are based in a teaching environment our charges are generally less than private practice. Please contact reception for information on the latest rates.

 

Do I need to have a general eye exam before referral into the Myopia Clinic?

No, referral from an optometrist or ophthalmologist is no longer a requirement for entry into the clinic. However, if you have recently had an eye exam and are referred in by an eyecare practitioner, the requirement for comprehensive eye exam to rule out other pathologies may be bypassed.

Atropine, in the form of eye drops (or surface-acting discs shown here), is an effective drug for reducing the axial elongation associated with myopia. Its has been used in the eye many decades, as it can strongly dilate the pupil. 

Atropine, in the form of eye drops (or surface-acting discs shown here), is an effective drug for reducing the axial elongation associated with myopia. Its has been used in the eye many decades, as it can strongly dilate the pupil. 

 

Can I request to see a supervisor only?

Not usually. As part of a teaching clinic, most of the exam is conducted by an optometry student, similar to the registrar/consultant model at a public hospital. The student is required to report to the supervisor, who often comes in to check on certain aspects of the examination. All management considerations are decided upon after thorough discussion between the student and supervisor.

However, at certain times of the year, when students are otherwise unavailable, it may be possible to see a supervisor directly although this may need to be booked well in advance.

 

What techniques are used in the Myopia Control Clinic?

We apply the latest research to each individual. Common techniques are orthokeratology, soft contact lenses such as MiSight (invented and developed here in our lab), as well as custom design soft contact lenses, medicated eye drops, specialised glasses, ocular exercises and advice.

MiSight contact lenses are a daily soft disposable lens, and measure about 1/10th of a millimetre thick at the centre. They come in power steps of -0.25DS, from -0.25 to -6.00DS. 

MiSight contact lenses are a daily soft disposable lens, and measure about 1/10th of a millimetre thick at the centre. They come in power steps of -0.25DS, from -0.25 to -6.00DS. 

Do I need to bring anything to the appointment?

Just the patient, although often parents and other support people may wish to attend to take part in the discussion. Previous eye exam history or old glasses can also be helpful to bring with you to the initial appointment.

 

What is orthokeratology?

Orthokeratology (OK) is a special type of contact lens wear. A rigid lens, smaller than regular contact lenses, is worn overnight while asleep. It reshapes the front of the eye, and gives clear vision the following day - even after the lens is removed! OK is not for everyone though - but you can be assessed for suitability as part of the initial eye exam. 

 

Will it hurt?

Not usually! If you are new to contact lenses, sometimes there can be discomfort while you get used them, but we use the latest technology to ensure quick adaptation. Worst case, we have local anaesthetic available.

Atropine is only commercially available at 1% concentration, so it often requires compounding. These bottles contain solutions compounded in conjunction with the School of Pharmacy, and were used as part of a drug tolerability trial in the Myopia Control Clinic. We compared the side effects of very low concentrations of atropine in order to determine the most effective dose. 

Atropine is only commercially available at 1% concentration, so it often requires compounding. These bottles contain solutions compounded in conjunction with the School of Pharmacy, and were used as part of a drug tolerability trial in the Myopia Control Clinic. We compared the side effects of very low concentrations of atropine in order to determine the most effective dose.